Shinkai Chawan

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Shinkai Chawan

from 190.00

This antique bowl was crafted by Kanzan Shinkai around the year 1930. Please see below for bio information.

This deep walled matcha bowl is perfect for vigorous whisking. The stunning hand painted finish has an incredible modernist touch and while on the larger side the bowl maintains an impressive balance and lightness.

This bowl is sold with a wooden box.

Included:

1 x Shinaki Bowl

As a set includes:

1 x Hand Carved bamboo chashaku matcha whisk. Hand made in Nara, Japan, these scoops are dead stock and no longer manufactured due to scarcity of this exact breed of bamboo.

1 x hand carved chasen matcha whisk. These 100 tine whisks were carved from a single piece of bamboo. Each piece is crafted by Kyosuke Kubo using a technique that creates a thinner, easier to use whisk. Chasen of this quality last much longer than cheaply manufactured imitation Chasen.

1 x 20g Shinme Matcha. Vibrant and invigorating, our Shinme Matcha is round and silky with a balanced sweetness and pervasive finish.

Shinkai Kanzan was born the grandson of Seifu Yohei III in 1912 and was raised from a baby in the confines of the Gojo-zaka ceramic district of Kyoto, inducted daily into the realm of pottery by his father and grandfather. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, and moved on to study painting (after his fathers urging) before returning to ceramics under Kiyomizu Rokubei V and Vi. He was first accepted into the Teiten (later Nitten) National Exhibition in 1930, and was displayed there consistently thereafter as well as others, being prized at the 1939 San Francisco Exposition. Just as he was beginning to take off as an artist, he was drafted and sent to China, whereafter he spent three years in a Russian Gulag in Siberia. Upon his return to Japan, he branched out on his own; with a unique vision grounded in the roots of the training and instruction he had receved before the war, but with a new style and concept to differentiate himself from his peers. In 1951 he was recognized with the Gold Award at the Japanese Art Expo. Following many prizes, In 1974 he was granted the Governors prize at the Nitten, and in 1980 the Niohon Geijutsu-in Sho (Japanese Art Academy prize). In 1989 he was awarded the Kyoto Prefectural Cultural Order of Merit for his life-long endeavors. Works by him are held in the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art among others.

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